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Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Madalyn Morgan in the Spotlight


Meet the amazing Madalyn Morgan


Madalyn Morgan I have been an actress for more than thirty years working in Repertory theatre, the West End, film and television.  I am also a radio presenter and journalist, writing articles for newspapers and magazines.

     I was brought up in a busy working class pub in the market town of Lutterworth in Leicestershire.  The pub was a great place for an aspiring actress and writer to live. There were so many wonderful characters to study and accents to learn.  My parents wanted me to get a ‘proper job,’ which I did.  I became a hairdresser, but at twenty-four I gave up my successful hairdressing salon and wig-hire business for a place at E15 Drama College, and a career as an actress.

    In 2000, with fewer parts available for older actresses, I taught myself to touch type, completed a two-year correspondence course with The Writer’s Bureau, and started writing.  I loved it.  So, after living in London for thirty-six years, I came back to Lutterworth, swapping window boxes and a mortgage for a garden and the freedom to write.



     I am currently writing the third novel in the Dudley Sister’s Saga.  China Blue is Claire’s story.  It’s a love story set in England and France, with the WAAF, SoE and French Resistance.  Applause, my second novel (published March 2014), is set in London during the Blitz and sees the second Dudley sister, Margot, climb from usherette in a West End theatre to the leading lady.  The first in the quartet, Foxden Acres, is Bess Dudley’s story.  It is about the strength of women, letting go and moving on.  Set in the Midlands it features the RAF and an army of land girls.  



Foxden Acres and Applause are available on Amazon in paperback and e-book.

7 comments:

  1. Thank you for shining the Spotlight on me, Pauline. I am pleased, and proud, to be a member of this fabulous group of authors. Again, thank you.

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  2. Fab feature! Wishing you every success Madalyn. x

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  3. What an interesting story. Is being an actress helpful when promoting your books? I'm thinking you might not be as shy as some of us when it comes to author presentations, books signings, advocating for shelf space in libraries and bookstores, etc. Have your connections made during your acting career proved useful in marketing your novels?

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    1. Hi Eileen. Thank you for leaving a comment. To answer your question, about promoting and marketing. No! I was never able to network as an actress and I still can't. There's a fine line between being confident and being pushy. I've met actors and writers who are the latter, and I tend to shut down when I come across them. Don't get me wrong, I get excited and love to share my good news, but there are ways of doing it, and I hope when I do it it's out of a sense of joy. Tell you the truth it is mostly out of surprise. I'm still surprised, and of course excited, that anyone wants to read what I write.

      Having been an actress is a massive help to me when I'm creating characters. I was a method actor. I believed in the characters I played and I embodied them entirely. I was them on stage - and occasionally off stage too, which was't so good. I found it easy to be someone else. It was letting go at the end of the play that I found difficult. But you must let go, or you'd go mad. Besides, you have to have the head space to take on the next character in the next play. That's how I work with the characters in my novels. I love them, live them, go through what they go through - and at the end of the book I have to let go because, as in my acting days, by then they've exhausted me. Let go and move on to the next book and the next family of characters. Currently it's Claire in China Blue. I already know her, understand her, and love her. Oh goodness, reading this back makes me sound as if I have a screw lose. I haven't, honestly. x

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  4. Both stories are fascinating...the authour's growing up and the war stories too.

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    1. Thank you for reading the post, Rosemary. I have mixed feelings about my childhood. I was loved very much, but growing up in a busy pub wasn't all pop and crisps. Mum and dad worked seven days and seven nights a week - and being an only child I resented them working so much. When I got older, however, I understood that they were working to give me, us as a family, a better life.

      My lovely mum used to sit with a cup of coffee tell me all about the war; the dances she went to, the bands, the young servicemen that she and the girls in the factory wrote to. My middle name is Vanda, after a Polish airman's sister who mum wrote to in WWII. I can see her now. Happy days. x

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